Here are a couple more short stories giving insight into African culture. Enjoy!

Western Time, African Time

Each day as we drive the ten miles or so to the meeting, we pick up various ones who have requested transportation. We always agree on a time and a place so that there is no confusion, though sometimes this doesn’t work.

Training my translators. They speak Japadola here, so Alfred cannot help with the translation. He is enjoying being a student for a change.

Training my translators. They speak Japadola here, so Alfred cannot help with the translation. He is enjoying being a student for a change.

On Tuesday as we arrived at our last pick up along the road, the man was nowhere to be seen. We waited about ten minutes. Finally, being a westerner through and through, I said, “Where is the man? It is 10:30 and we agreed to meet at 10:15.”

Schovia, the young lady who was sitting in the back seat and had just called the man for about the fourth time on his cell phone and had finally succeeded in raising him, said, “This is Africa, Papa. He is showering.”

This simple story tells much about the cultural differences between the Western world and the African/Middle Eastern mindset. A musungu needs to avoid Africa if impatience is a character trait. Or perhaps they need to come here, so God can teach them the gift of patience.

The church facility where we are holding the Tororo Conference - Asignet Pentecostal Church. One of the prettiest sites I have been invited to.

The church facility where we are holding the Tororo Conference – Asignet Pentecostal Church. One of the prettiest sites I have been invited to.

Die, Snake

I am teaching a five day conference in Tororo this week. During lunch I like to catch up on the good stories of the lives of the Christians in this area. They often seem to walk at a more consciously miraculous level than we do in the West. Here is a story told by the leader of the conference, a pastor who himself has been bitten three times by snakes and has miraculously recovered each time.

During the days of the troubles (Idi Amin and after) a certain Christian knew he needed to migrate to Kenya as a refugee because the environment had become too dangerous for Christian leaders in Uganda. However, he had no money for the trip. So he prayed and asked God to deliver him.

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Gathering stories during the break.

As we was sitting in his yard shortly after that, a snake entered the yard and moved in his direction. No one knows what kind of snake it was at this late date, but Uganda has many black mambas and African cobras, both very poisonous. Of course, he was “concerned.”

As the snake drew near, by faith he suddenly cried out, “Die, snake!”

At that moment, the snake curled up and died right in front of him. Needless to say, he praised the Lord.

This story was told about the village because it was truly amazing for such a thing to happen. Another man who was visiting the village requested to meet the man, and when they met, he asked him to tell the story in person, which he gladly did, for Ugandan Christians are always giving testimony. As he finished the story, the listener was delighted and asked the man his plans and needs. He told him he needed to migrate to Kenya as a refugee but did not have the funds.

Immediately, this other man pulled out his wallet and gave him the money to go to Kenya as a reward for telling such a wonderful and entertaining testimony. All things truly work together for good to them who love God and are called according to His purpose (Rom. 8:28).